The International Association of Blacks in Dance

Celebrating 30 Years of the Annual Conference and Festival

IABD 30 YEARSRe Newed. Re Defined. Re Imagined. Looking Toward The Future...

THE INTERNATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF
BLACKS IN DANCE

MEMBERS IN THE NEWS

DITCHING BALLET CLASS TO FIND A MENTOR AND A NEW WAY TO MOVE
By Gia Kourlas, NY Times
Photo by Rudolf Costin
Evidence DanceMore than 20 years ago, the dancer Arcell Cabuag peeked into a studio at Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater and fell in love. It wasn’t romantic love, but a rarer kind — dance love. Without knowing exactly what he was looking at, he had found his choreographer: Ronald K. Brown. Mr. Brown’s choreography blends modern dance with African traditions, like West African and Afro-Cuban dance, to create a mix both earthy and spiritual. Beginning Feb. 6 at the Joyce Theater, Mr. Brown will pay homage to Mr. Cabuag’s 20th anniversary as a member of his company, Evidence, by creating a new duet featuring the two of them, “Den of Dreams.”

Continue Reading

ARTHUR MITCHELL'S DANCE THEATRE OF HARLEM: THE EARLY YEARS
By Zita Allen, Amsterdam News
Photo credit: “Dance Theatre of Harlem Souvenir Program Guggenheim Museum Premier ,” Columbia University Libraries Online Exhibitions, accessed February 1, 2018, https://exhibitions.cul.columbia.edu/exhibits/show/mitchell/item/10859.

DTH

Dance Theatre of Harlem (DTH), the dance school and Black ballet company founded in 1969 by Arthur Mitchell with Karel Shook was a product both of Mitchell’s visionary genius and belief in the transformative power of art.  However, it was equally a product of the cultural, social, and political forces of the era that gave birth to it.  While the history of DTH has much in common with other newly created cultural institutions, its founders, dancers, repertory, and audiences are, in many ways, distinctive. This look at the early years of DTH, from 1969 to 1985, examines key aspects of this cultural change-agent that helped it do what others could not.

Continue Reading

PEW FELLOW OF THE WEEK:
AN INTERVIEW WITH WRITER AND
CULTURAL SCHOLAR
BRENDA DIXON GOTTSCHILD

Brenda Dixon GottschildPhoto by Ryan Collerd
Our “Pew Fellow of the Week” series focuses on the artistic lives of our Pew Fellows: their aspirations, influences, and creative challenges.

This week, we speak to Brenda Dixon Gottschild (2017) whose 50-year career as a writer and cultural scholar surveys the presence and influence of the black dancing body in America, in what she calls “choreography for the page”—an “embodied, subjunctive approach to research writing.” She has published a wide range of books, essays, and articles, including Waltzing in the Dark: African American Vaudeville and Race Politics in the Swing Era (2000), for which she received the 2001 Congress on Research in Dance Award for Outstanding Scholarly Dance Publication. She began her career as a professional performer in modern dance and experimental theater, and in recent years she has re-entered the field as a performer with a solo work on race. Most recently, she performed with her husband and Pew Fellow Hellmut Gottschild in BalletX’s presentation of Nicolo Fonte’s Beautiful Decay.

Continue Reading

DANCER SPOTLIGHT:
ROBERT MOSES DANCER
CRYSTALDAWN BELL

SAN FRANCISCO, CA – San Francisco Chronicle's Claudia Bauer featured Robert Moses' KIN veteran Crystaldawn Bell in a wonderful article. CLICK HERE to learn more about Crystaldawn's life on and off the stage, and then read on for information about how you can watch her onstage yourself next month in Bootstrap Tales! "Tall, technically commanding and alluringly musical, she dances with riveting emotional presence and tractor-beam charisma."

Crystaldawn Bell

Crystaldawn Bell

Age: 31

Lives in: Berkeley

What she does: The modern dancer is in her seventh season with San Francisco’s Robert Moses’ Kin and freelances for indie choreographers.

Continue Reading

ALABAMA STATE UNIVERSITY
JUST HIRED COLLEGE FOOTBALL'S
FIRST "FLEXIBILITY COACH"

By Doug Samuels, February 7, 2018
MONTGOMERY, AL - Every so often in college football a program tries to blaze a new trail with a title that hasn’t been done before.

ASUTwo recent examples come to mind. It happened at Arizona when they named Matt Dudek (now at Michigan) their General Manager. Shortly after Geoff Collins landed the Temple head coaching job, he named college football’s first S.W.A.G coordinator – standing for specialist with advanced graphics. Sure other programs have creative directors and social media people that likely carry similar duties, but Temple was the first to have a S.W.A.G coordinator.

Alabama State may have just added themselves to that short list by naming Michael Medcalf their “flexibility coach.”

Continue Reading